You
patient reported outcomes
National Renal Care

Physical wellbeing for patients on long-term haemodialysis

70.7% 70.7% 70.7%
Percentage of patients who report that their physical wellbeing is within the range recommended for patients on long-term haemodialysis.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Haemodialysis is a treatment that filters waste and water from your blood if your kidneys cannot do it for you. Patients are asked about how their condition and treatment impacts their physical activities such as self-care, walking, climbing stairs, and moderate or vigorous activities. This information is used in planning the best treatment plan for that individual person.

What does this mean for you?
Physical wellbeing

Technical information

This result shows you the extent to which a patient’s health impacts their physical activities such as self-care, walking, climbing stairs, and moderate or vigorous activities. It is reported as a percentage of the total physical component summary score. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the survey and reporting standards from the RAND 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36).

The data source is the NRC’s specifically designed IT system, the Patient Care System, in which the SF-36 data is captured and scored.

The measurement is calculated by converting each question’s answer to a percentage of the total possible score. The physical composite score is the average of the percentages for each question included in that composite score.

You
patient reported outcomes
National Renal Care

Mental wellbeing for patients on long-term haemodialysis

89.8% 89.8% 89.8%
Percentage of patients who report that their mental wellbeing is within the range recommended for patients on long-term haemodialysis.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Haemodialysis is a treatment that filters waste and water from your blood if your kidneys cannot do it for you. Patients are asked about how their condition and treatment impacts their mental well-being. It includes depression, behavioural and emotional control, anxiety and feelings of belonging. This information is used in planning the best treatment plan for that individual person.

What does this mean for you?
Mental wellbeing

Technical information

This result shows you the extent to which a patient’s health impacts their mental wellbeing and includes depression, behavioural and emotional control, anxiety, and feelings of belonging. It is reported as a percentage of the total mental component summary score. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the survey and reporting standards from the RAND 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36).

The data source is the NRC’s specifically designed IT system, the Patient Care System, in which the SF-36 data is captured and scored.

The measurement is calculated by converting each question’s answer to a percentage of the total possible score. The mental composite score is the average of the percentages for each question included in that composite score.

You
patient reported outcomes
Akeso Clinics

Improvement in depression severity

0.875 0.875 0.875
Improvement in depression severity during an admission is measured using the Aw effect size. Results above 0.71 indicate a large improvement.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Most patients admitted to Akeso Clinics suffer from depression, either as the main reason for their admission or in addition to their other condition. On admission, patients are asked about the severity of their depression symptoms. This is used by the patient and their healthcare team to plan the treatment for their depression. At the end of their stay, the survey is repeated to review their progress towards recovery.

What does this mean for you?
Improvement in depression severity

Technical information

This result is an Aw effect size which measures the size of the difference between the admission and discharge depression severity score. An Aw effect size greater than 0.71 is considered to be a large effect. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the nine item depression scale of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The statistical methods used align with the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

The data source is Google Workplace’s Forms and Sheets which are used to capture survey responses.

The measure is based on the Non-Parametric Common Language Estimator (Aw) for effect size.

You
patient reported outcomes
Akeso Clinics

Improvement in level of functioning

0.714 0.714 0.714
Improvement in level of functioning during an admission is measured using the Aw effect size. Results above 0.71 indicate a large improvement.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Mental illness impacts your ability to function physically, mentally and socially in your day-to-day life. On admission, patients are asked about how their day-to-day life has been affected. This information is used by the patient and their healthcare team to better understand the impact of their illness and to plan their treatment. At the end of their stay, the survey is repeated to review their progress towards recovery.

What does this mean for you?
Improvement in level of functioning

Technical information

This result is an Aw effect size which measures the size of the difference between the admission and discharge scores for the level of functioning. A higher score is better. An Aw effect size greater than 0.71 is considered to be a large effect.

The measurement is based on survey results from the World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Scale 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) for level of functioning. The statistical methods used align with the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

The data source is the Salesforce CRM platform which is used to capture survey responses and contains admission data transferred to it from the Akeso hospital billing system.

The measure is calculated using the Non-Parametric Common Language Estimator (Aw) for effect size and Cliff’s Confidence Interval Procedure.

You
patient reported outcomes
Akeso Clinics

Improvement in symptom severity

0.848 0.848 0.848
Improvement in symptom severity during an admission is measured using the Aw effect size. Results above 0.71 indicate a large improvement.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Needing to be admitted is often a result of the severity of the symptoms caused by your mental illness. On admission, patients are asked about how often they have experienced the various symptoms of mental illness. This information is used by the patient and their healthcare team to understand the burden of their illness on them and to plan their treatment. At the end of their stay, the survey is repeated to review their progress towards recovery.

What does this mean for you?
Improvement in symptom severity

Technical information

This result is an Aw effect size which measures the size of the difference between the admission and discharge scores for symptom severity. A higher score is better. An Aw effect size greater than 0.71 is considered to be a large effect.

The measurement is based on survey results from the DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure for symptom severity. The statistical methods used align with the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

The data source is the Salesforce CRM platform which is used to capture survey responses and contains admission data transferred to it from the Akeso hospital billing system.

The measure is calculated using the Non-Parametric Common Language Estimator (Aw) for effect size and Cliff’s Confidence Interval Procedure.

You
patient reported experience
Akeso Clinics

Akeso doctors

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020
Always treated with courtesy and respect
94.2% 94.2% 94.2%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your doctor treat you with courtesy and respect.
Always listen carefully
92.7% 92.7% 92.7%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your doctor listen carefully to you.
Always explain in a way you understand
92.1% 92.1% 92.1%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your doctor explain things in an understandable way.
How are doctors in the Akeso Clinics performing?

Technical information

These results are the percentage of patients who responded to the question and rated their experience as ‘always’. A higher score is better. The response options are always, usually, sometimes and never.

The measurements are based on the survey and reporting standards of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).

The data source for Akeso clinics, a paper version of the HCAHPS aligned survey is made available to patients before they leave the hospital. Their responses are subsequently captured in an electronic form and the data from each clinic consolidated centrally.

The measurement is calculated as the number of patients who rated their experience for the question as ‘always’ divided by the number of patients that responded to the question, reported as a percentage.

You
patient reported experience
Akeso Clinics

Akeso nurses

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020
Always treated with courtesy and respect
81.1% 81.1% 81.1%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your nurse treat you with courtesy and respect.
Always listen carefully
78.8% 78.8% 78.8%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your nurse listen carefully to you.
Always explain in a way you understand
81.0% 81.0% 81.0%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your nurse explain things in an understandable way.
How are nurses in the Akeso Clinics performing?

Technical information

These results are the percentage of patients who responded to the question and rated their experience as ‘always’. A higher score is better. The response options are always, usually, sometimes and never.

The measurements are based on the survey and reporting standards of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).

The data source for Akeso clinics, a paper version of the HCAHPS aligned survey is made available to patients before they leave the hospital. Their responses are subsequently captured in an electronic form and the data from each clinic consolidated centrally.

The measurement is calculated as the number of patients who rated their experience for the question as ‘always’ divided by the number of patients that responded to the question, reported as a percentage.

You
patient reported experience
Netcare Hospitals

Netcare doctors

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020
Always treated with courtesy and respect
90.6% 90.6% 90.6%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your doctor treat you with courtesy and respect.
Always listen carefully
86.7% 86.7% 86.7%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your doctor listen carefully to you.
Always explain in a way you understand
84.6% 84.6% 84.6%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your doctor explain things in an understandable way.
How are doctors in the Netcare hospitals performing?

Technical information

These results are the percentage of patients who responded to the question and rated their experience as ‘always’. A higher score is better. The response options are always, usually, sometimes and never.

The measurements are based on the survey and reporting standards of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).

The data source for Netcare hospitals is the HCAHPS survey which is emailed to patients after they’ve left the hospital. The patients’ responses are delivered directly to a Netcare database and once entered, cannot be manipulated.

The measurement is calculated as the number of patients who rated their experience for the question as ‘always’ divided by the number of patients that responded to the question, reported as a percentage.

You
patient reported experience
Netcare Hospitals

Netcare nurses

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020
Always treated with courtesy and respect
77.2% 77.2% 77.2%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your nurse treat you with courtesy and respect.
Always listen carefully
68.4% 68.4% 68.4%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your nurse listen carefully to you.
Always explain in a way you understand
67.4% 67.4% 67.4%
Percentage of patients who rated their experience as ‘always’ in response to the question how often did your nurse explain things in an understandable way.
How are nurses in the Netcare hospitals performing?

Technical information

These results are the percentage of patients who responded to the question and rated their experience as ‘always’. A higher score is better. The response options are always, usually, sometimes and never.

The measurements are based on the survey and reporting standards of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).

The data source for Netcare hospitals is the HCAHPS survey which is emailed to patients after they’ve left the hospital. The patients’ responses are delivered directly to a Netcare database and once entered, cannot be manipulated.

The measurement is calculated as the number of patients who rated their experience for the question as ‘always’ divided by the number of patients that responded to the question, reported as a percentage.

You
patient reported experience
Netcare Hospitals

Individual hospital performance

Current period: The previous 12 months, up to the most recent completed calendar month

Your feedback on interactions with our staff is valuable information that assists us to address areas which are important to you, and improve the quality of our care and services. It is important as your experience impacts your recovery from your illness. Patients who participate in making decisions regarding their treatment and whose personal values and desired results are considered, are more likely to understand and follow their treatment plans, and often have a better recovery.

You can use this search function to find information on the patient experience survey results for each Netcare hospital and Emergency Department.

Individual Netcare hospital performance

Technical information

These results are the average score for the set of questions included in each category. A higher score is better. The graph shows the distribution of the patients’ answers for the question responses in that category. The response options are always, usually, sometimes and never.

The measures are based on the survey and standards of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). These rates have been independently validated and watermarked.

The data source is the HCAHPS survey which is emailed to patients after they’ve left the hospital. These patients’ responses are delivered directly to a Netcare database and once entered, cannot be manipulated.

The measure is calculated as the average score of the questions for each category. It is reported as a percentage. The graph shows the distribution of the patients’ responses as a percentage of the questions answered

You
Patient reported outcomes
Netcare Cancer Care

Level of wellbeing for patients with cancer

Current period: Apr 2020 - Sep 2020

Along their cancer journey patients experience varying degrees of wellbeing, affecting their quality of life and the way they function. Patients are asked by their oncology nurse navigator to rate their level of wellbeing, a measure of overall physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual comfort, happiness or health at that moment in time. This information is used to plan the best treatment options and supportive measures for a patient at that point in their journey.

What does this mean for you?
Level of wellbeing for patients with cancer

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients reporting the best wellbeing or severe discomfort and unhappiness at the time of completing the assessment. It is reported as a percentage.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), a tool used to assess nine symptoms common in patients with cancer. A score of 0 represents the best feeling of wellbeing and a score of 10 the worst possible feeling of wellbeing.

The data source is the Netcare Cancer Care Division’s specifically designed IT system, the Oncology Nurse Navigator Data Capture System, in which the ESAS data is captured and scored.

The measure for severe discomfort or unhappiness is calculated as the number of patients reporting a score from 7 to 10 out of 10 for their level of wellbeing divided by all patients who completed the level of wellbeing question in the period under review. A lower score is better.

You
Patient reported outcomes
Netcare Cancer Care

Level of pain for patients with cancer

Current period: Apr 2020 - Sep 2020

Cancer pain can be both a sensory and emotional experience for a patient with cancer. As each person experiences their pain differently, we regularly ask our patients to rate their level of pain on a scale that ranges from no pain at all, to the worst possible pain at that moment in time. For patients with pain, both non-medication and medication options are explored and the doctor is contacted for assistance.

What does this mean for you?
Level of pain for patients with cancer

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients reporting no or severe pain at the time of completing the survey. It is reported as a percentage.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), a tool used to assess nine symptoms common in patients with cancer. A score of 0 represents no pain and a score of 10 the worst possible pain.

The data source is the Netcare Cancer Care Division’s specifically designed IT system, the Oncology Nurse Navigator Data Capture System, in which the ESAS data is captured and scored.

The measure for no pain is calculated as the number of patients reporting a score of 0 out of 10 for their level of pain divided by all patients who completed the level of pain question in the period under review. A higher score is better.

The measure for severe pain is calculated as the number of patients reporting a score from 7 to 10 out of 10 for their pain divided by all patients who completed the level of pain question in the period under review. A lower score is better.

You
Patient reported outcomes
Netcare Cancer Care

Level of distress for patients with cancer

Current period: Apr 2020 - Sep 2020

Distress is an unpleasant physical, mental, emotional, social or spiritual experience affecting the way a person thinks, feels and acts. Everyone with cancer experiences distress at some point. Patients are asked by their oncology nurse navigator to rate their level of distress in the last week on a scale from no distress to extreme distress. The information is used by your healthcare team to understand how you are coping and whether changes can be made to improve your comfort.

What does this mean for you?
Level of distress for patients with cancer

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients reporting no or severe distress in the week prior to and including the day of assessment completion. It is reported as a percentage.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Distress Thermometer for Patients, an 11 point Likert scale with the visual graphic of a thermometer.

The data source is the Netcare Cancer Care Division’s specifically designed IT system, the Oncology Nurse Navigator Data Capture System, in which the NCCN Distress Thermometer data is captured and scored. A score of 0 represents no distress and a score of 10 extreme distress.

The no distress measure is calculated as the number of patients reporting a score of 0 out of 10 for their level of distress divided by all patients who completed the level of distress question in the period under review. A higher score is better.

The severe distress measure is calculated as the number of patients reporting a score from 7 to 10 out of 10 for their level of distress as a percentage of all patients who completed the level of distress thermometer in the period under review. A lower score is better.

Best
Best Results

Improved survival prospects for trauma patients

Priority 1 trauma patients who have severe physical injuries requiring immediate life-saving care, have a better prospect of surviving when treated in a trauma-specialised emergency department. Netcare operates the only three Accredited Level-1 Trauma Centres in Africa. They are accredited by the Trauma Society of South Africa. Using 5 years of data from Netcare’s emergency departments and advanced analytics, we have shown that priority 1 trauma patients admitted to Milpark and Union Hospitals have a 76% reduction in their mortality rate. St Anne’s Hospital was excluded as it was not accredited in the period under review.

Improved survival prospects for trauma patients

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage reduction in the mortality rate for P1 trauma patients admitted to the Milpark and Union Hospital, Level-1 Trauma Units accredited by the Trauma Society of South Africa. St Anne’s Hospital was excluded as it was not accredited in the period under review.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published in international literature for developed countries. This research has not been done in the South African context.

The data source is the specifically designed IT system for our emergency departments, Medibank, which is used to record clinically relevant patient information, such as an injury severity scores. The mortality data applied to patients who died in the emergency department or in the hospital during the associated trauma-related admission.

The measurement was calculated using a stepwise forward multivariate linear regression on 5 years of emergency department data for P1 trauma patients to identify those factors relevant to the analysis. The presence of a Level-1 trauma unit at a hospital was found to have a statistically significant impact on the probability of survival, all other factors being equal.

Best
Best Results

Improved independence for patients with strokes

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel to the brain is either blocked or bursts. Each person experiences a stroke differently. The multidisciplinary team at Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital develops a customised plan to get you as independent and productive as you can.

What does this mean for you?
Improved independence for patients with strokes

Technical information

The improved independence result shows you the extent to which a patient admitted to the Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital following a stroke has progressed in performing their everyday activities independently. It is reported as an average weekly improvement of the total Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score between admission and discharge. A higher score is better.

The measurement is the FIM score, a widely accepted measurement tool used in hospital rehabilitation programmes. It was developed as part of the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation at the State University of New York. The FIM measures the amount of assistance a person requires to carry out everyday activities.

The data source is the South African Database for Functional Medicine (SADFM), a 3rd party software system, which is used to capture and store every patient’s rehabilitation programme data.

The measure is calculated by subtracting the admission FIM score from the discharge FIM score for patients discharged after a stroke for the period under review. This difference is the overall FIM score gain for patients discharged in the period under review. The average weekly score is calculated by dividing the difference by the number of weeks the patient was admitted.

Best
Best Results

Improved independence for patients with an acquired brain injury

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

An acquired brain injury is an injury to the brain that occurs at any time during your life, except birth. There are many different causes. The effects of the injury depends on the part of the brain injured and the extent of the damage. The multidisciplinary team at Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital plans your treatment based on how the brain damage has affected you.

What does this mean for you?
Improved independence for patients with an acquired brain injury

Technical information

The improved independence result shows you the extent to which a patient admitted to the Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital with an acquired brain injury has progressed in performing their everyday activities independently. It is reported as an average weekly improvement of the total Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score between admission and discharge. A higher score is better.

The measurement is the FIM score, a widely accepted measuring tool used in hospital rehabilitation programmes. The FIM measures the amount of assistance a person requires to carry out everyday activities.

The data source is the South African Database for Functional Medicine (SADFM), a 3rd party software system, which is used to capture and store every patient’s rehabilitation programme data.

The measure is calculated by subtracting the admission FIM score from the discharge FIM score for patients discharged after an acquired brain injury for the period under review. This difference is the overall FIM score gain for patients discharged in the period under review. The average weekly score is calculated by dividing the difference by the number of weeks the patient was admitted.

Best
Best Results

Improved independence for patients with a spinal cord injury

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

A spinal cord injury can cause damage to the spinal cord blocking the messages from the brain to parts of the body. This results in a loss of mobility and sensation in the affected areas. The multidisciplinary team at Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital develops your treatment plan depending on how your injury has impacted you.

What does this mean for you?
Improved independence for patients with a spinal cord injury

Technical information

The improved independence result shows you the extent to which a patient admitted to the Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital with a spinal cord injury has progressed in performing their everyday activities independently. It is reported as an average weekly improvement of the total Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score between admission and discharge. A higher score is better.

The measurement is the FIM score, a widely accepted measuring tool used in hospital rehabilitation programmes. The FIM measures the amount of assistance a person requires to carry out everyday activities.

The data source is the South African Database for Functional Medicine (SADFM), a 3rd party software system, which is used to capture and store every patient’s rehabilitation programme data.

The measure is calculated by subtracting the admission FIM score from the discharge FIM score for patients discharged after a spinal cord injury for the period under review. This difference is the overall FIM score gain for patients discharged in the period under review. The average weekly score is calculated by dividing the difference by the number of weeks the patient was admitted.

Best
Best Results

Improved independence for patients with an amputation

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

An amputation is the surgical removal of a part of your body, typically a limb. The loss of a limb has a severe impact on a person’s mobility and self-image. The multidisciplinary team at Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital develops an individualised treatment programme for you from your initial recovery to the time when you are fitted with a specially designed and manufactured prosthetic limb.

What does this mean for you?
Improved independence for patients with an amputation

Technical information

The improved independence result shows you the extent to which a patient admitted to the Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital with an amputation has progressed in performing their everyday activities independently. It is reported as an average weekly improvement of the total Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score between admission and discharge. A higher score is better.

The measurement is the FIM score, a widely accepted measuring tool used in hospital rehabilitation programmes. The FIM measures the amount of assistance a person requires to carry out everyday activities.

The data source is the South African Database for Functional Medicine (SADFM), a 3rd party software system, which is used to capture and store every patient’s rehabilitation programme data.

The measure is calculated by subtracting the admission FIM score from the discharge FIM score for patients discharged after an amputation for the period under review. This difference is the overall FIM score gain for patients discharged in the period under review. The average weekly score is calculated by dividing the difference by the number of weeks the patient was admitted.

Best
Best Results

Improved independence for patients with polytrauma

6.86 6.86 6.86
Average weekly improvement in everyday activities score for patients with polytrauma.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Polytrauma refers to when a patient has two or more severe injuries in two or more areas of their body. This typically happens in serious accidents. The multi-disciplinary team care approach at Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital is ideally suited for polytrauma patients. Your rehabilitation programme is uniquely formulated to cater for your specific needs depending on your injury and how it will impact your daily life.

What does this mean for you?
Improved independence for patients with polytrauma

Technical information

The improved independence result shows you the extent to which a patient admitted to the Netcare Rehabilitation Hospital with polytrauma has progressed in performing their everyday activities independently. It is reported as an average weekly improvement of the total Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score between admission and discharge. A higher score is better.

The measurement is the FIM score, a widely accepted measuring tool used in hospital rehabilitation programmes. The FIM measures the amount of assistance a person requires to carry out everyday activities.

The data source is the South African Database for Functional Medicine (SADFM), a 3rd party software system, which is used to capture and store every patient’s rehabilitation programme data.

The measure is calculated by subtracting the admission FIM score from the discharge FIM score for patients discharged after polytrauma for the period under review. This difference is the overall FIM score gain for patients discharged in the period under review. The average weekly score is calculated by dividing the difference by the number of weeks the patient was admitted.

Best
Best Results

Necrotising enterocolitis in newborn babies

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a serious disease that can develop in babies when the inner lining of their gut becomes damaged. NEC is more common in very sick or preterm babies. Babies who are only fed breast milk are less likely to develop this disease. Breast milk is easier to digest and it contains substances that help fight infections and help the gut cells to mature.

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
Necrotising enterocolitis in newborn babies

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of all babies and babies with a birthweight of 501g to 1 500g admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) that developed necrotising enterocolitis (NEC). It is reported as a percentage. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definition and methodology of the Vermont Oxford Network (VON), a global not for profit company that collates and benchmarks babies’ outcomes from participating hospitals.

The data source is the Vermont Oxford Network’s Nightingale system. Data from babies admitted to a NICU is captured in the eNIQ app, anonymised and sent to the Nightingale system from which reports can be extracted.

The all babies’ measure is calculated as the number of all babies that developed NEC in a NICU that captures VON data divided by the number of babies admitted to a NICU capturing VON data for the period under review.

The babies with a birthweight of 501g to 1 500g measure is calculated as the number of babies with a birthweight of 501g to 1 500g that developed NEC in a NICU that captures VON data divided by the number of babies with a birthweight of 501g to 1 500g admitted to a NICU capturing VON data for the period under review.

Best
Best Time

How quickly Netcare 911 responds

16.40 16.40 16.40
minutes
Response Time - from answering call to arriving to help.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

When you need an ambulance, the time it takes for us to come and help you is critical. Netcare 911 measures the response time, the time from when we answer your call to when we arrive to help you.

What is Netcare 911 doing to keep getting better?
How quickly Netcare 911 responds

Technical information

This result shows you the median time in minutes from when a call is answered to when the emergency medical services (EMS) arrives at the scene.

The measurement is based on the international and South African standard for measuring EMS effectiveness, the Response Time.

The data sources are the Netcare 911 telephony, dispatch and Electronic Patient Report Forms.

The measurement is calculated as the median of the response times for the period.

Best
Best Time

Managing pain prehospital

64.4% 64.4% 64.4%
Percentage of patients reporting a reduction in significant pain prehospital.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Pain is frequently the reason a person calls an ambulance for help. Netcare 911 uses a pain scale out of ten to ask a patient about their level of pain. When needed, the patient is given the appropriate pain treatment and their pain score repeated to check if their pain is getting better.

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
Managing pain prehospital

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients with significant pain whose pain is reduced before they arrive at the hospital. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is is based on an eleven point Likert scale where 0 is no pain and 10 is the most severe pain. A score of 6 or above is considered significant pain.

The data source is the Geopal Electronic Patient Report Form, a Netcare designed IT system, where the EMS staff capture the initial and subsequent patient reported pain scores.

The measure is calculated as the number of patients who report their pain being reduced to 5 or less divided by the number of patients that report their first pain score as 6 or more out of 10 for the period under review.

Best
Further information
Best Time

Transporting patients to the best place

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020
PRIORITY 1 TRAUMA PATIENTS
60.5% 60.5% 60.5%
Percentage of trauma patients requiring immediate life-saving care transported to Level 1 or 2 accredited trauma centres.
PATIENTS WITH CARDIAC CHEST PAIN
81.3% 81.3% 81.3%
Percentage of patients with cardiac chest pain transported to hospitals with a cardiac catheter laboratory.
PATIENTS THAT MAY HAVE A STROKE
60.6% 60.6% 60.6%
Percentage of patients with stroke symptoms transported to hospitals with specialised stroke services.
Transporting patients to the best place

Technical information

This result shows you the proportion of patients with severe life threatening trauma, cardiac chest pain or a possible stroke who are transported to a hospital with the specialised services available (doctors and equipment) to rapidly diagnose and treat their condition. It is reported as a percentage per condition. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the ambulance crew’s assessment that a patient has cardiac chest pain or a possible stroke. Severe life threating trauma is defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of less than 15 and/or a Shock Index of 1 or more. Netcare maintains a list of the level 1 and 2 Trauma Units accredited by the Trauma Society of South Africa and the specialised services published for cardiac chest pain and strokes for hospitals in South Africa.

The data source is the Geopal Electronic Patient Report Form, a Netcare designed IT system, where the EMS staff capture the patient’s condition and the hospital to which the patient is transported.

The measure is calculated as the number of patients with that condition that were transported to a hospital with the specialised services available for that condition divided by the number of patients with that condition that were transported for the period under review.

Best
Best Time

How quickly antibiotics are administered for severe infections

88.0% 88.0% 88.0%
Percentage of patients who get their 1st dose of an antibiotic within one hour of prescription.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

For patients seriously ill with an infection, the time from when an antibiotic is prescribed by the doctor to when the first dose is given is critical for the best possible results.

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
How quickly antibiotics are administered

Technical information

This result shows the percentage of eligible patients who received the first dose of their first antibiotic within one hour of it being prescribed. It is calculated from a sample of patient charts that have been reviewed by a pharmacist. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on a study conducted by Kumar et al (2006) and the surviving sepsis campaign guidelines. Kumar A, Roberts D, Wood KE, et al. Duration of hypotension before initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is the critical determinant of survival in human septic shock. Crit Care Med. 2006;34:1589–96.

The data source is the Bluebird system, a 3rd party software in which the pharmacists review patient charts and capture compliance to this measure.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of patients that received their first antibiotic within one hour of it being prescribed divided by the number of patients prescribed a first antibiotic.

Best
Best Way

Feeding newborn babies with breast milk only

45.2% 45.2% 45.2%
Percentage of babies discharged from neonatal ICU on breast milk only.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a serious disease of the gut in babies. Babies who are fed only breast milk are less likely to develop this disease. Breast milk is easier to digest and it contains substances that help fight infections and help the gut cells to mature. Netcare promotes breast milk for babies admitted to our Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU).

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
Feeding newborn babies with breast milk only

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of babies admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) that were discharged on breast milk only. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the definition and methodology of the Vermont Oxford Network (VON), a global not for profit company that collates and benchmarks newborn babies’ outcomes from participating hospitals.

The data source is the Vermont Oxford Network’s Nightingale system. Data from babies admitted to a NICU is captured in the eNIQ app, anonymised and sent to the Nightingale system from which reports can be extracted.

The measure is calculated as the number of babies that were discharge on breast milk only from a NICU that captures VON data divided by the number of babies admitted to a NICU capturing VON data for the period under review.

Best
Best Way

Feeding newborn babies with donor breast milk

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a serious disease of the gut in babies. Babies who are fed breast milk are less likely to develop this disease. For those babies whose mother's milk is not available, donor breast milk can be used. Netcare operates five Ncelisa Human Milk Banks supported by thirty seven collection points for mothers to donate their excess breast milk. This is provided free of charge to the public and private sector.

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
Feeding pre-term babies donor breast milk

Technical information

This result shows you the number of mother’s donating their excess breast milk and the number of babies who have been fed with the donated breast milk. A higher score is better.

The measurement is aligned with draft regulations from the South African Department of Health and is in line with international protocols on the management of human milk banks.

The data source is NICUfeed, a system that tracks and traces breast milk donations from donor to recipient, recording all details relevant to matching age appropriate donor milk to the recipient babies.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of mothers and babies.

Best
Best Way

Maintaining a normal temperature for newborn babies

58.1% 58.1% 58.1%
Percentage of babies whose temperature was normal within the 1st hour of admission to neonatal ICU.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

All newborn babies, but particularly those who are not well, are at risk of developing a low body temperature (<36.5°C) and care is taken to help them maintain a normal temperature. Early identification of a baby at risk, together with regular temperature monitoring, is important. Should a baby’s temperature start decreasing, prompt action will prevent the baby from developing the complications of a low temperature.

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
Maintaining a normal temperature for newborn babies

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of babies admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) whose temperature was between 36.5°C and 37.5°C within the first hour of their admission. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the definition and methodology of the Vermont Oxford Network (VON), a global not for profit company that collates and benchmarks newborn babies’ outcomes from participating hospitals.

The data source is the Vermont Oxford Network’s Nightingale system. Data from newborn babies admitted to a NICU is captured in the eNIQ app, anonymised and sent to the Nightingale system from which reports can be extracted.

The measure is calculated as the number of babies whose first temperature was between 36.5°C and 37.5°C and was taken within the first hour of their admission to a NICU that captures VON data divided by the number of babies whose temperature was taken within the first hour of their admission to a NICU capturing VON data for the period under review.

Best
Best Way

Screening newborn babies' hearing

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Late identification of infant and child hearing loss can severely impact their development. In collaboration with HI HOPES, the community outreach arm of the Centre for Deaf Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, Netcare introduced the first South African universal newborn hearing screening programme in June 2019. Screening is done 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

What is Netcare doing to keep getting better?
Newborn babies screened

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of newborn babies screened for hearing loss before being discharged from our hospitals. The result is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on international best practice for Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS), which uses the 1:3:6 formula – screening by one month, diagnosis by three months and early intervention started by six months of age.

The data source is a South African UNHS data logging and management app custom developed for Netcare, the Hi Hopes-Netcare UNHS App. This app supports the UNHS process and monitors the follow-up of any newborn referred for further care and ultimately diagnosed with a hearing loss.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of newborn babies screened divided by the number of live births for the period under review.

Best
Best Way

Calcium - bone and mineral disorder for patients on long-term haemodialysis

68.5% 68.5% 68.5%
Percentage of patients whose latest calcium blood results are within the range recommended for patients on long-term haemodialysis.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Calcium is the most abundant mineral found in your body, most of it in your bones and teeth. For patients’ on long-term haemodialysis, their bone metabolism may become out of balance which can result in a bone disorder. The levels of calcium in their blood are monitored regularly and, as necessary, treatment is given to either increase or lower their calcium levels.

What is National Renal Care doing to keep getting better?
Effectiveness of haemodialysis for patients needing long-term care

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients whose latest blood test results are within the range recommended by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry.

The data sources are National Renal Care’s patient care system.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of patients’ results that are within the recommended range divided by the number of tested patients for the period under review.

Best
Best Way

Phosphates - bone and mineral disorder for patients on long-term haemodialysis

48.1% 48.1% 48.1%
Percentage of patients whose latest phosphate blood results are within the range recommended for patients on long-term haemodialysis.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Phosphates is a mineral found in your bones. Along with calcium, phosphates is needed to build strong healthy bones and it also keeps other parts of your body healthy. Patients on long-term haemodialysis may develop a high level of phosphates which can damage their body. In addition to dialysis, they need to reduce the phosphates in their diet and take medication that limits the build-up of phosphates.

What is National Renal Care doing to keep getting better?
Effectiveness of haemodialysis for patients needing long-term care

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients whose latest blood test results are within the range recommended by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry.

The data sources are National Renal Care’s patient care system.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of patients’ results that are within the recommended range divided by the number of tested patients for the period under review.

Best
Best Way

Haemoglobin - anaemia for patients on long-term haemodialysis

53.8% 53.8% 53.8%
Percentage of patients whose latest haemoglobin blood results are within the range recommended for patients on long-term haemodialysis.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Haemoglobin is a blood test used to diagnose anaemia, a condition where there are not enough red blood cells to carry oxygen in your body. For patients on long-term haemodialysis, anaemia is caused by not enough iron, which the body uses to make red blood cells, and/or the kidneys are not making enough of the hormone, erythropoietin, which signals the body to make more red blood cells. Treatment includes iron supplements, medication that stimulates your body to make more red blood cells and blood transfusions.

What is National Renal Care doing to keep getting better?
Effectiveness of haemodialysis for patients needing long-term care

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients whose latest blood test results are within the range recommended by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry.

The data sources are National Renal Care’s patient care system.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of patients’ results that are within the recommended range divided by the number of tested patients for the period under review.

Best
Best Way

Albumin – nutritional insufficiency for patients on long-term haemodialysis

85.8% 85.8% 85.8%
Percentage of patients whose latest albumin blood results are within the range recommended for patients on long-term haemodialysis.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Albumin is a protein made by the liver from the foods you eat. It provides your body with the protein needed for growth and tissue repair, keeps fluid from leaking out of your blood vessels into your surrounding tissues and helps you fight infections. Patients on long-term haemodialysis may have a low albumin level, leaving them more vulnerable to infections and reducing the effectiveness of their dialysis. A correct, personalised diet is important to maintaining an adequate albumin level.

What is National Renal Care doing to keep getting better?
Effectiveness of haemodialysis for patients needing long-term care

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients whose latest blood test results are within the range recommended by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (KDOQI) and the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), an international disease registry.

The data sources are National Renal Care’s patient care system.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of patients’ results that are within the recommended range divided by the number of tested patients for the period under review.

Safest
Infection Prevention

Any infection acquired in hospitals

1.01 1.01 1.01
Any infection acquired in hospital.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Infections can develop while you are admitted in hospital. Every effort is made to protect you from infections, with special attention given to patients with diseases that affect their body's ability to fight an infection.

What is Netcare doing to protect you from infections? What can you do to reduce your risk of developing an infection?
Any infection acquired in hospital

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient acquires an infection two or more days after being admitted to hospital. It is reported at a rate per 100 admissions. All infections are reported, whether or not they are a result of being in hospital. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

The data sources are the Bluebird system, a 3rd party software used to record pathology results and specialist infection control nurses’ notes, for the data on the infections and the hospital billing system, SAP, for the admission data.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of infections that developed two days after admission divided by the number of patients that were admitted to hospital multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Infection Prevention

Infected operation wounds

0.08 0.08 0.08
Number of operation wound infections for every 100 patients who have a major operation.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Infections in your operation wound can occur within 30 days after the operation in the part of the body where the surgery took place. The elderly, overweight and people who smoke are at greater risk of developing an infection as are those with diabetes, cancer or other medical problems or diseases.

What is Netcare doing to protect you from infections? What can you do to reduce your risk of developing an infection?
Infected operation wounds

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient develops a wound infection after a major operation. It is reported at a rate per 100 major operations. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definition published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

The data source is the Bluebird system, a 3rd party software used to record pathology results and specialist infection control nurses’ notes, for the data on the number major operations and wound infections.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of wound infections that were identified in hospital after a major operation divided by the number of patients that had a major operation multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Infection Prevention

Urinary tract infections

1.09 1.09 1.09
Number of urinary tract infections for every 100 patients who have a catheter (tube) placed in their bladder.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

A urinary tract infection is an infection in the bladder, which stores the urine, and/or the kidneys, which filter the blood to make urine. While in hospital, you may have a urinary catheter, a thin tube, placed in your bladder to drain the urine into a bag. Patients with a catheter have a higher risk of developing an infection as germs can travel along the catheter and cause a urinary tract infection.

What is Netcare doing to protect you from infections? What can you do to reduce your risk of developing an infection?
Urinary tract infections

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient acquires a urinary tract infection after a catheter (tube) has been inserted into their bladder to drain their urine while they are in hospital. It is reported at a rate per 100 catheters inserted. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definition published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

The data source is the Bluebird system, a 3rd party software used to record pathology results and specialist infection control nurses’ notes, for the data on the catheters inserted into bladders and infections.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of urinary tract infections that developed after a catheter was inserted into a bladder divided by the number of patients that had a catheter inserted while in hospital multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Infection Prevention

Blood stream infections

1.64 1.64 1.64
Blood stream infections per 100 central lines inserted.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

A blood stream infection can occur after a doctor has placed a tube in a large vein to give a seriously ill patient medicine and fluids or to do medical tests easily. A blood stream infection occurs when germs enter the body along this tube and into the blood stream. To prevent infections the tube must be inserted under sterile conditions, maintained carefully and removed as soon as it is no longer needed.

What is Netcare doing to protect you from infections? What can you do to reduce your risk of developing an infection?
Blood stream infections

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient acquires a blood stream infection after a catheter (tube) has been inserted into a large vein while they are in hospital. It is reported at a rate per 100 catheters inserted. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definition published by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

The data source is the Bluebird® system, a 3rd party software used to record pathology results and specialist infection control nurses’ notes, for the data on the catheters inserted into large veins and infections.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of blood stream infections that developed after a catheter was inserted into a large vein divided by the number of patients that had a catheter inserted while in hospital multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Antibiotic Stewardship

Use of antibiotics

96.4 96.4 96.4
Defined daily dose, a standardised international measure of antibiotic use per 100 patient days.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Bacteria are constantly evolving and developing resistance mechanisms to the antibiotics used against them. Antibiotic resistance is a global problem and common infections are becoming more difficult to treat because the antibiotics used are becoming less effective. Inappropriate and unnecessary use of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance. Netcare has a well-established, active antibiotic stewardship programme which promotes the responsible use of antibiotics. A key metric for the programme is the use of antibiotics in our hospitals.

What is Netcare doing to promote the responsible use of antibiotics? What can you do to promote the responsible use of antibiotics?
Use of antibiotics

Technical information

This result shows you a statistical measure of the overall use of antibiotics in Netcare hospitals. The defined daily dose (DDD) is the assumed average maintenance dose per day of a drug used for its main indication in adults. It is reported as a number per 100 patient days, which are overnight stays in our hospitals.

The measurement is based on the definition and methodology from the World Health Organisation (WHO). It is a standardised calculation developed to compare and measure antibiotic use over time and across different geographies.

The data source is antibiotic billing and patient day data from our hospital billing system, SAP.

The measure is calculated by multiplying the antibiotic DDD per drug by the amount of stock issued per drug divided by the number of patient days in our hospitals multiplied by 100. Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim combination antibiotics are excluded from this calculation.

Safest
Further information
Antibiotic Stewardship

Appropriate use of an antibiotic

Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020
RIGHT ANTIBIOTIC
99.1% 99.1% 99.1%
Percentage of patients receiving the right antibiotic for their infection.
RIGHT ANTIBIOTIC DOSE
99.1% 99.1% 99.1%
Percentage of patients receiving the right antibiotic dose for their infection.
RIGHT ANTIBIOTIC DURATION
98.1% 98.1% 98.1%
Percentage of patients receiving the right antibiotic duration for their infection.
Appropriate use of antibiotics

Technical information

This result shows you the percentage of patients in Netcare hospitals who received the right antibiotic at the right dose for the right duration according to their infection. It is calculated from a sample of patient charts that have been reviewed by a pharmacist. It is reported as a percentage. A higher score is better.

The measurement is based on antimicrobial stewardship principles as recommended by the World Health Organisation and the National Department of Health’s Strategic Framework on Antimicrobial Resistance in South Africa.

The data source is the Bluebird® system, a 3rd party software, in which the pharmacists review patient charts and capture compliance to these measures.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of antibiotic prescriptions that did not require a pharmacist’s intervention for possible inappropriate antibiotic selection, dose or duration divided by the number of antibiotic prescriptions reviewed by the pharmacists.

Safest
Medicine Safety

Preventing medicine related patient harm

0.04 0.04 0.04
Number of medicine related events that result in harm, no matter how minor, for every 100 patients admitted to Netcare hospitals.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Medicine is an important and large part of your treatment when you are in hospital. It is used to treat your condition and to relieve your symptoms. In a hospital many people and processes are involved in getting you the correct medicine when you need it. This requires checks and safe practices to prevent errors which could result in harm to a patient.

What are Netcare hospitals doing to protect you? What can you do to reduce your risk of medicine related harm?
Preventing medicine related harm at Netcare Hospitals

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient suffers harm, no matter how minor, from a medicine related event when admitted to hospital. It is reported as a rate per 100 admissions. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI).

The data source is our specifically designed IT system, the Incident Management System (IMS), which we use to report any issues and track how we are doing. All staff are encouraged to use this system to report issues of concern to them. The IMS system is used for the data on medicine related events and the hospital billing system, SAP, for the admission data.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of medicine events that resulted in harm, divided by the number of patients that were admitted to hospital, multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Medicine Safety

Preventing medicine related patient harm

0.07 0.07 0.07
Number of medicine related events that result in harm, no matter how minor, for every 100 patients admitted to Akeso Clinics.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Medicine is an important and large part of your treatment when you are in hospital. It is used to treat your condition and to relieve your symptoms. In a hospital many people and processes are involved in getting you the correct medicine when you need it. This requires checks and safe practices to prevent errors which could result in harm to a patient.

What are Akeso Clinics doing to protect you? What can you do to reduce your risk of medicine related harm?
Preventing medicine related harm at Akeso Clinics

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient suffers harm, no matter how minor, from a medicine related event when admitted to hospital. It is reported as a rate per 100 admissions. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI).

The data source is the Akeso Incident Register developed using data collection and reporting tools from Google Workplace, a 3rd party system. All staff are encouraged to use this system to report issues pertaining to patients during their admission that are considered reportable and of concern to them. The Akeso Incident Register is used for the data on medicine related events and the hospital billing system, Clinic Manager, for the admission data.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of medicine events that resulted in harm, divided by the number of patients that were admitted to hospital, multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Medicine Safety

Preventing medicine related patient harm

0.04 0.04 0.04
Number of medicine related events that result in harm, no matter how minor, for every 10 000 visits to Medicross.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Each visit to a Medicross practice typically results in you receiving medicine while in the practice and/or it being prescribed for you as part of your treatment plan. Medicross staff are trained on standard operating procedures that ensure the safe administration of medicine and prevent or reduce the likelihood of any medicine related harm.

What is Medicross doing to protect you from medicine related harm? What can you do to reduce your risk of medicine related harm?
Preventing medicine related harm at Medicross practices

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient suffers harm, no matter how minor, from a medicine related event at a Medicross practice. It is reported as a rate per 10 000 visits to a doctor or dentist at a Medicross practice. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology the World Health Organisation (WHO) Technical Series on Safer Primary Care: Medication Errors.

The data source is our specifically designed IT system, the Incident Management System (IMS), which we use to report any issues and track how we are doing. All staff are encouraged to use this system to report issues of concern to them. The IMS system is used for the data on medicine related events and the Medicross billing system, ME Plus, for the admission data.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of medicine events that resulted in harm, divided by the number of patients that visited a doctor or dentist at a Medicross practice, multiplied by 10 000 for the period under review.

Safest
Fall Prevention

Falls that result in injury

0.11 0.11 0.11
Number of falls that result in an injury, no matter how minor, for every 100 patients admitted to Netcare hospitals.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

While we can all fall anywhere, the possibility of falling increases during your stay in hospital. There are many reasons for this and why you may feel unsteady or dizzy when getting out of bed or walking around by yourself. This includes being on pain medication, the unfamiliar surroundings, recovering from an operation or simply being in bed for a long time.

What is Netcare hospitals doing to protect you from falling? What can you do to reduce your risk of falling?
Falls that result in injury at Netcare hospitals

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient, older than 18 years, falls and injures themselves, no matter how minor the injury, while in hospital. It is reported at a rate per 100 admissions. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the National Quality Forum (NQF) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

The data sources: We manually report any issues in our specifically designed IT system, the Incident Management System (IMS), which we use to track how well we are doing. All staff are encouraged to use these systems to report any issues of concern to them. The IMS system is used for the data on falls and the hospital billing system, SAP, for the admission and age data.

The measurement is calculated by counting the number of falls that resulted in an injury, divided by the number of patients, 18 years and older, that were admitted to hospital, multiplied by 1 000 for the period under review.

Safest
Fall Prevention

Falls that result in injury

0.66 0.66 0.66
Number of falls that result in an injury, no matter how minor, for every 100 patients admitted to Akeso Clinics.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

While we can all fall anywhere, the possibility of falling increases during your stay in hospital. There are many reasons for this and why you may feel unsteady or dizzy when getting out of bed or walking around by yourself, such as side effects from your medication and the unfamiliar surroundings

What is Akeso Clinics doing to protect you from falling? What can you do to reduce your risk of falling?
Falls that result in injury at Akeso Clinics

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient, older than 18 years, falls and injures themselves, no matter how minor the injury, while in hospital. It is reported at a rate per 100 admissions. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the National Quality Forum (NQF) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

The data source is the Akeso Incident Register developed using data collection and reporting tools from Google Workplace, a 3rd party system. All staff are encouraged to use this system to report issues of concern to them. The Akeso Incident Register is used for the data on falls and the hospital billing system, Clinic Manager, for the admission and age data.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of falls that resulted in an injury, divided by the number of patients, 18 years and older, that were admitted to hospital, multiplied by 100 for the period under review.

Safest
Pressure lesion prevention

Developing a severe pressure lesion

0.02 0.02 0.02
Number of patients that develop a large, deep pressure lesion for every 100 patients admitted to hospital.
Current period: Oct 2019 - Sep 2020

Pressure lesions are sores on the skin that can develop if you are confined to a bed or wheelchair nearly all the time. They usually develop over the bony parts of your body where there is little padding from fat, such as the heels or hips. Pressure lesions can develop even when an illness or an injury keeps you in a bed or wheelchair for a short period. Certain conditions make it difficult for pressure lesions to heal, such as diabetes, hardening of the arteries or poor nutrition

What is netcare doing to protect you from developing a pressure lesion? What can you do to reduce your risk of developing a pressure lesion?
Developing a severe pressure lesion

Technical information

This result shows you how often a patient, older than 18 years, develops a pressure lesion that is large and deep, reaching muscle and bone, while admitted in hospital for a medical or surgical condition. It is reported at a rate per 100 admissions of 3 days or longer. A lower score is better.

The measurement is based on the definitions and methodology published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

The data sources: We manually report any issues, including bed sores, in our specifically designed IT system, the Incident Management System (IMS), which we use to track how well we are doing. We use the IMS system for the data on pressure lesions and the hospital billing system, SAP, for the admission and age data.

The measure is calculated by counting the number of stage III and IV pressure lesions, divided by the number of patients, 18 years and older, that were admitted to hospital for a medical or surgical condition multiplied by 100 for the period under review. Obstetric admissions and admissions for less than 3 days are excluded.

We measure the best and safest care for you

When we measure quality of care, we are guided by our purpose of "Providing you with the best and safest care". Using scientifically sound criteria, we continually measure the quality of our care for you and share with you how we are performing over time.

Explore the data now
How do we ensure that standards are maintained?
How do we ensure that standards are maintained?

Our work includes sustaining a world-class Quality Management System, where we monitor compliance to processes recognised to result in the best and safest care.

How do we do this?

Through the British Standards Institute (BSI) independent ISO 9001: 2015 certification, which was awarded to the Group in 2018 and again in 2019 (Hospital Division, Medicross, Radiation Oncology, National Renal Care and Netcare 911).

Submitting annual returns to the Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC) as well as complying with the required submission of Early Warning System Indicators (EWSI).

Conducting internal quality reviews which check documentation, processes and outcomes against standards, score the results and identify areas needing focused improvement.